Archive for the ‘HDR’ Category

Grass Roots

© 2010 Gary Udstrand

Roots

To me this picture has several meanings.  Growing up in this area of MN it is quite literally the origin of my roots.  The Town Hall itself represent the real grass roots of our political system.  It is here that government starts and provides the seeds of democracy.  Pretty cool when you think about it.

But it is not only a place of politics but also a place for gathering.  Like all good rural gatherings there is conversation, sometimes about politics but often about people.  It is no different here; living in the country can sometimes feel isolated and places like this represent something more.

HDR

This image above actually started as three separate exposures.  While I have written about other HDR images in this blog, this one is just a bit different, at least in the terms of tools and techniques.  My attempts at HDR have included Photoshop, Photomatix and Lightroom/Enfuse.    I have achieved great results with all three but with the recent purchase of the Nik plugin Suite I have added a fourth,  Nik HDR Efex Pro.

Nik HDR Efex Pro

I am a big fan of Nik filters and could not wait to try out the latest plugin from Nik.  It is an ambitious and well thought out plugin and  I soon discovered two things, 

Tone Mapping

First, it does a fantastic job with tone mapping.    It is very flexible and offers a myriad of options and controls.  These can be somewhat intimidating so the provided presets are very welcome.  And very good.

Besides the provided presets there are also other preset options available for download on the web.   Getting great results can be as easy as clicking on the various presets until you find one you like.  If it is not quite what you want you can tweak away, knowing that you can save your own preset should you come up with “the look”.

Alignment and Ghosting

HDR by its very definition requires that you shoot multiple images of the same scene which are later blended and/or merged.  Anytime you are dealing with this you have to deal with image alignment and sometimes with ghosting issues.

Of the two, ghosting can be the more difficult.  In the case of the image above the wind was gusting and blowing 30-40 mph.  Hard enough that when I went to merge the images I found that the telephone pole in the foreground had moved several inches at the top and caused no end of problems   No matter what I did I could not get Nik HDR Efex Pro to adequately remove the ghosting.

Luckily for me, just as I was struggling with this image I ran across a posting on the Canon 5D Mark II mail list outlining a technique that would address the issue I was experiencing.  One of the list members, Henry Heerschap, had posted an outline of a technique he was using with great success.  He was using the superior alignment/ghosting capabilities of Photoshop CS5’s HDR Pro to create the 32 bit image, and once created he would load it into HDR Efex Pro to do the tone mapping and any other tweaking.

Henry also adds a few other pointers to the technique.

  • Make sure to check the anti-ghosting checkbox in HDR Pro!
  • Select 32 bit in CS5’s HDR Pro.  You want to save all the image information for HDR Efex Pro
  • Since most tweaking and tone mapping will take place in NEP the only tweak needed in CS5 HDR Pro is to move the slider mostly to the right to recover all the highlights.  

I have to say, this works very well.  I had all but given up on the image above but using this technique I was able to get the results I wanted.   Until Nik improves their ghosting/alignment techniques I plan to make great use of Henry’s technique.   For that, I have to send a big Thanks Henry’s way…. So, Thanks! 

Farm Setting

© 2010 Gary Udstrand – Farm Setting

The Day

The sunset over the horizon punctuated a bitterly cold December day.   The wind was brisk and did its best to remove the warmth from my face and hands, and quite successfully I might add.  Winter in Northern MN can be cold and bleak but it can also be beautiful.   This day I was glad that I braved the weather to enjoy the glow of the sunset.   Even if it was just for a moment; it reminded me that spring is getting closer every day. 

Getting the shot

The click and the click and the click of the shutter.  What??  If you have not already guessed, the picture above is actually three pictures combined together to produce an HDR image.   In a nutshell a HDR image is a photograph that attempts to capture more dynamic range than traditional techniques.

The dynamic range of an image is the difference in the luminance between the lightest and darkest areas of an image.  Make sense?  Probably not, but think of it this way.   Have you ever taken a picture of someone standing in front of a window inside the house during a bright sunny day?   If you have you have more than likely ended up with a picture in which the person is nothing more than a silhouette while the yard and trees outside look great.  Or, if your camera is a little “smarter” you may have ended up with a nice picture of the person surrounded by a wash of blown out white.  Gone are the nice trees and yard.  

If you were thinking ahead and used a fill flash to even out the bright whites of the sunny outdoors and the shadows of the person in front of you then you might get a picture with both.  However, when shooting landscapes and scenery using a fill flash is just not practical or possible in many cases.

That is where HDR enters the picture (pun intended).  Essentially you take multiple exposures of the scene.  Using the above scenario you would take one that exposed the person correctly and one for the highlights of the window.   Then you could combine the images and tone map the results and get both properly exposed.

HDR

For many landscape photographers HDR offers a new and creative way to capture the scenery before them.   HDR has been around for a few years but many photographers have yet to embrace or understand the technique.   It can be complicated, and it can be intimidating but these days there are a number of great software tools to assist the photographer.  Myself, I use Nik HDR Efex Pro and to a lesser extent the HDR tone mapping in Photoshop CS 5.

In the picture above I took three exposures, one at a –2 EV, one at 0 EV and one at +2 EV.  These three images were then imported into Lightroom.  Next, I selected the three images and from within Lightroom exported them into Nik HDR Efex Pro.    I tried a few of the presets and found one that I thought best represented the scene.  I tend to favor the more natural look in my HDR’s but many are fans of more over processed look too. 

The plugin has numerous options and tweaks and could keep the tinkerer busy for many hours.  For those just looking for a quick result there are also several very good presets.  Click on a few and ifind one you like.  It is as easy or involved as you like.  Besides the presets that come pre-installed with the plugin you can also find other presets available to be downloaded on the web. 

Setting

HDR is a great way to create new images of even familiar places.  It can add new variety to your pictures and maybe even fuel some creative inspiration.    Get out there with your camera in hand and give it a try.   You may find an entirely new way to enjoy your photography. 

Smile

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